Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes


Go back in time... The beauty of the South (the trees in this case)... Say around 1861 to 1865... What trees were commonplace? As it was a time of War, a War for Freedom and Independence from tyranny... What trees were there? Which trees were used or available during the time of struggle?

Many of these species are available on this webpage as seedlings, to perpetuate the legacy, and perhaps also serve as a reminder of the War Between the States (or the American Civil War). We offer to you, a piece of "living history", live trees for your home garden landscaping projects. Not that any of these were grown from seeds collected from any battlefield or such, BUT, these are the same true native species that were present during that time.

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your
Home and Garden Landscapes Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes

Plant trees... and Consider the Past...

Consider if you will, Ecclesiastes 1:4 "One generation comes, another goes, but the earth abides forever". America has a rich variety of trees. Even hundreds of years later, through all of the cutting and clearing to build the colonies, and then to build a nation, through wars and rebuilding, amid the great changes and growth of America, the trees are still here! Granted, some species have become few and far between, and new foreign and hybrid trees are commonplace, but we remain a nation rich in a variety of trees. Just like the scripture verse, amongst the great changes, you might say that new generations of trees remain...

Now consider the War for Second Independence... Trees were a critical part of the war effort, found in every landscape, used in numerous ways both for passive domestic use and for the conflict specifically. Amazing when you think about it... Wood was used in every campfire, for building ships and gunstocks, fed the fires of steamtrain boilers and the industrial machine to make implements of war (and commerce). Wood was used for forts and later on in the trenches as the complexity of killing changed. Trees of every type, and every species were likely used, some more than others, some for food, others for the flowers to adorn the homes and manors of the time.

The good news is that we are making many of these same species available to plant... Although there are hundreds of trees that we could offer, we have narrowed it down to 20. Want others? See the Catalog...

Trees of the Confederacy

Divided into 3 Sections, as per the 3 Southern Armies -

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Army of Northern Virginia

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Army of the Tennessee

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Army of the Trans-Mississippi

Our heritage and history is rich with fortitude and innovation, faith and struggle, and here we are today still moving forward! Let's not forget our past, the wrongs done, the prejustices, and the events that changed America... But also remember the culture, the beauty, the trees certainly, as the Civil War era was also a time of gallantry, loyalty, good manners, and a formal society with those lovely big-hooped ballgowns. You can almost hear the voice of Scarlet O'Hara calling after Rhet Butler... "Rhet, Rhet... get me a Paw Paw tree, would you please..." Ours is a land full of beautiful landscapes, rolling hills, mountains, rivers and creeks, farmland, the seashore, and towns. All of which have trees, many of these tree species had ancestors that were used perhaps during the Civil War...


Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes

Trees of the Confederacy

Divided into 3 Sections, as per the 3 Southern Armies -

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Army of Northern Virginia<

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Army of the Tennessee

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Army of the Trans-Mississippi


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Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes

Join the ranks! Defend your homeland! Now is the time boys... give 'em hell! Re-Enact...Visit a battle near you!

Songs of the Confederacy - Play a piece of history! Beautiful favorites from a golden timeSongs of the South... Beautiful piano favorites from a golden time. Get yours!

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home
and Garden Landscapes

Heritage - Not Hatred... and the Confederate Flag

"What's with that flag... Are you a Racist? Do you hate black people?"

These are the two most common reactions most people have when they see the Confederate flag. This one "symbol" has, and continues to, divide the unity of this great nation, and it should Not be so...

First of all, the "flag", was Not a symbol, but a flag carried by the southern forces during the Civil War. And correctly so, this is Not the Confederate flag! This is the "Union Jack", often called the "Battleflag", BUT, as it was the most widely used, and certainly the iconic symbol of the South today.

Whether a symbol, logo, or other icon, the flag was a part of Our American history... Fact. Neither the flag or the Southern that served (or those living today) is a racist per se, BUT rather, "What is in a man's heart, that is what they are". True, there are those who would be considered bigots and racists among all peoples - black, white, brown, red, yellow, and pink... Yes, we all have heart issues to deal with, but "the flag" was and is a part of Our history, it happened, and should be revered for that part of our past. Many of us have traced our lineage and family trees to those who fought and died for what they believed in, just as those that fought for the north, and those who fought in all of the other wars and conflicts in Our history.

Do your homework... the stuff not taught in our liberal PC schools. Read books, there are thousands upon thousands of them at your local library. At least watch the video series, like the "Civil War Journal" and the Ken Burns series. There are others as well, and these will add a lot more information and perhaps some insight as to the war, the mindset at the time, and more about "the flag". Before the racist card is again waved, at least make an honest effort to learn something...

And what about the slavery issue? Unfortunately, slavery and the battleflag are too often associated, but as you learn about the civil war, you will learn something very interesting... The Civil War was Not fought over slavery! Slavery was the catalyst that exploded the struggle, but it was not "the" reason the conflict started. Again, do your homework... Certainly owning another person is wrong, slavery is a curse of men in power, seeking greed and self at the expense of all people (want to argue todays banking issues here? Slavery is alive and flourishing in America today, just a slightly different means). In Lincolns election campaign and his 1860 inaugural speech, he reiterated over and over about keeping the union together, and nothing about slavery. Only after getting his tailed kicked over and over during the early part of the war, Lincolns support for the war effort desperately needed a new rallying cry... which was the slavery issue. It was a political move (although a personal desire for sure), which then helped to push the momentum for ultimate northern success.

Still, the battleflag marched on during the conflict, and still flies proudly today, not about slavery and hatred (well hopefully not much), but rather to honor the past and the support of our heritage.

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes

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Featured Trees

Paw Paw

Sassafras

Sourwood

Carolina Silverbell

Southern Red Oak

Florida Dogwood

Southern Magnolia

Black Cherry

Old Man's Beard

Red Mulberry

Col. Blue Spruce

Red Maple

Quaking Aspen

Coast Redwood

Giant Sequoia

Northern Red Oak

White Oak

Pecan (Hickory)

Sweetgum

Weeping Willow

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden
Landscapes Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes



Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes What is the SCV?

The citizen-soldiers who fought for the Confederacy personified the best qualities of America. The preservation of liberty and freedom was the motivating factor in the South's decision to fight the Second American Revolution. The tenacity with which Confederate soldiers fought underscored their belief in the rights guaranteed by the Constitution. These attributes are the underpinning of our democratic society and represent the foundation on which this nation was built.

Today, the Sons of Confederate Veterans is preserving the history and legacy of these heroes so that future generations can understand the motives that animated the Southern Cause.

The SCV is the direct heir of the United Confederate Veterans, and the oldest hereditary organization for male descendents of Confederate soldiers. Organized at Richmond, Virginia in 1896, the SCV continues to serve as a historical, patriotic, and non-political organization dedicated to ensuring that a true history of the 1861-1865 period is preserved.

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Membership in the Sons of Confederate Veterans is open to all male descendants of any veteran who served honorably in the Confederate armed forces.

Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes Learn more... click here


Trees of the Confederacy - A Living Civil War History for Your Home and Garden Landscapes
Charge to the Sons of Confederate Veterans

"To you, Sons of Confederate Veterans, we will commit the vindication of the cause for which we fought. To your strength will be given the defense of the Confederate soldier's good name, the guardianship of his history, the emulation of his virtues, the perpetuation of those principles which he loved and which you love also, and those ideals which made him glorious and which you also cherish."

Lt. General Stephen Dill Lee, Commander General,
United Confederate Veterans,
New Orleans, Louisiana, April 25, 1906.



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Web Author: Empire National Nursery - of SCV Camp 2192, Mebane, NC
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